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Recognizing and Repairing Plagiarism
 

Direct Plagiarism

Direct Plagiarism: When a writer copies large portions of a single text without citation.

Excerpt from Martin Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail"

Original Text:
Perhaps it is easy for those who have never felt the stinging darts of segregation to say, "Wait." But when you have seen vicious mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim; . . .

Direct Plagiarism
During the Civil Rights movement African-American leaders asked local clergy to think about what it would feel like to see vicious mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim. This was an effective way to get them to empathize with the movement.

How to Fix It: Always put quotation marks around the direct quote.
During the Civil Rights movement African-American leaders asked local clergy to think about what it would feel like to experience racism. In his famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail," Martin Luther King, Jr. (1963) entreated them to imagine how it would feel to "see vicious mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim . . . " (p.1). This was an effective way to get them to empathize with the movement.


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