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Recognizing and Repairing Plagiarism
 

Incomplete or Incorrect Citations; also Called Accidental Plagiarism

Incomplete or Incorrect Citations; also Called Accidental Plagiarism: When sources are inadequately cited. These can be:

  • Partially cited sources that don't include all the needed information (the author's name is included, but not the page number)
  • Inaccurate citation information (the wrong name or publication title is used)
  • Verbatim quotations that are cited but not put in quotation marks
  • Perfectly cited sources with little or no original work from the author in the final paper
  • Failing to cite paraphrased quotes in between direct quotes, thereby indicating that paraphrases are original ideas

For more information on incomplete or incorrect citations, see plagiarism.org.

Excerpt from Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail"

Original Text:
I must make two honest confessions to you, my Christian and Jewish brothers. First, I must confess that over the past few years I have been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro's great stumbing block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen's Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to "order" than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: "I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action"; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man's freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a "more convenient season."

Accidental Plagiarism:
Martin Luther King, Jr. (1963) says in his "Letter from Birmingham Jail": "I must confess that over the past few years I have been gravely disappointed in the white moderate" (p.5). The black man's greatest problem is not the KKK, but the white moderate who prefers order to justice and peace with the absence of tension instead of peace because of justice. King said that the white moderate "paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man's freedom" (p.5). The white man lives by a mythical idea of time and always tells the Negro to wait for a better time.

How to fix it: put citations at the end of each paraphrase, or do not insert paraphrases between direct quotes.
Martin Luther King, Jr. (1963) says in his "Letter from Birmingham Jail": "I must confess that over the past few years I have been gravely disappointed in the white moderate" (p.5). The black man's greatest problem is not the KKK, but the white moderate who prefers order to justice and peace with the absence of tension instead of peace because of justice (p.5). King said that the white moderate "paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man's freedom" (p.5). The white man lives by a mythical idea of time and always tells the Negro to wait for a better time (p.5).


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